Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Casa Dragones Free Tasting - Today Dallas


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 larry mac

larry mac

    Agave Paladin

  • Agave friends
  • 598 posts

Posted 07 April 2011 - 12:20 PM

From the Dallas Morning News, yesterday:

"Taste one of the world's premium, small-batch tequilas with maestra tequilera Bertha Gonzalez Nieves, 5 to 7 pm, Thursday, Sigel's Fine Wines, 15003 Inwood Road, south of Belt Line, Addison; 972-387-9873 (make reservations)."

This is today folks! I called this morning to make a reservation, and I'm pretty sure she answered the phone herself.

best regards, lm

#2 totallytequila

totallytequila

    Agave Aficionado

  • Agave friends
  • 407 posts

Posted 07 April 2011 - 01:28 PM

From the Dallas Morning News, yesterday:

"Taste one of the world's premium, small-batch tequilas with maestra tequilera Bertha Gonzalez Nieves, 5 to 7 pm, Thursday, Sigel's Fine Wines, 15003 Inwood Road, south of Belt Line, Addison; 972-387-9873 (make reservations)."

This is today folks! I called this morning to make a reservation, and I'm pretty sure she answered the phone herself.

best regards, lm


Hey Larry let us know what your thoughts are on that juice. I can have my father ship me a bottle or two from NJ. Do you have a price point on any of the ages? Thanks!:t_up:

#3 larry mac

larry mac

    Agave Paladin

  • Agave friends
  • 598 posts

Posted 07 April 2011 - 03:13 PM

I googled it and the only thing I found were articles/news stories of the "joven". A 2 month blanco blended with 3 year anejo, in a crystal decanter and wooden box. Prices were 250 - $350 a bottle. All I see available is the joven, no repo or anejo. So I don't know what to expect. Surely they won't be giving too much of that away.

best regards, lm

#4 bpacifica

bpacifica

    Transcendent Agave Master

  • Agave friends
  • 1,374 posts

Posted 07 April 2011 - 09:04 PM

All I know and have heard is $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. Spread em and hold on cowboy!!!

#5 totallytequila

totallytequila

    Agave Aficionado

  • Agave friends
  • 407 posts

Posted 07 April 2011 - 09:20 PM

I can have my father ship me a bottle or two from NJ.



On second thought............:o

#6 Lippy

Lippy

    Agave Olympian

  • Agave friends
  • 2,771 posts

Posted 07 April 2011 - 10:47 PM

VERY interested in your thoughts on this Joven, Larry!

#7 larry mac

larry mac

    Agave Paladin

  • Agave friends
  • 598 posts

Posted 08 April 2011 - 10:09 PM

OK, this may be long and rambling.

There is only this product. No blanco, no repo, no anejo or XA.

First off, I had heard the word "joven", and knew it meant "young" or unaged, but had assumed it was an old term no longer used since all the tequilas I had ever seen were either blanco, platinum, crystal, silver or somesuch. After we were informed by Ms. Nieves that there were five official classifications of tequila; blanco, repo, anejo, XA, and joven, and that joven was a blend of blanco and XA, I googled it and sure enough, that is one of several definitions of joven. So I learned something.

Next, as my tequila friends know, I have no talent for discerning and describing the nuances (or lack thereof) of the noble juice. I'm a hack, and freely admit it. I do however, know when I like a product. I've tasted quite a few tequilas, good and bad. And I really liked this juice. For a blanco, and no technically it's not a blanco, it was spectacular. But it does look like a blanco, being perfectly crystal clear. It's one that when I inhale it, I smile and say "I could just smell this juice all night". It is most definately a fine sipping tequila.

You know how the product descriptions that the tequila makers provide usually sound ridiculous, with all kinds of fruit, spice, nuts, and floral flouishes? Well, I was reading the notes that are in a little book we got last night, and I have to wholeheartily agree with them. I don't think they overstated it:

"BODY & COLOR

Rich silk body, with brilliant platinum hues and long pronounced legs.

AROMA

Fresh and inviting, subtle floral and citrus aroma with notes of roasted agave.

TASTE

Soft and smooth with hints of vanilla and spiced undertones, balanced with delicate notes of pear.

Clean warm finish with hints of hazlenut and a bright, open aftertaste."

I didn't get the hazlenut, but everything else was right on.

Now to some production details. Some I got from Bertha, and some from her Texas sales director, Meridith Main. NOM 1489. They said they built their operations inside the plant. They use a diffuser. They use column distilation. They blend five year anejo with unaged product, then filter out all color. The XA is in new American Oak barrels. I asked if the XA was made with diffuser and she said yes.

They've spent some money on a very nice package of bottles, packaging, and promotional materials. The bottles are crystal, with a ground glass top. Very simple and understated, yet very elegant design. The box and promotional items are a beautiful blue color.

I would have loved to have a bottle, but at $270 plus tax = just under $300, I couldn't do it. It's simply out of my price range. For $100, yes no problem, I would have one for my collection. There were people buying it last night. But the type of people that shop at Siegels tend to have money. It's the most expensive liquor chain in Dallas. It was $250 next door at Goody Goody's.

I'd be curious to see what the blanco tasted like before they added the XA. Perhaps they had to blend XA with it to have any flavor given the diffuser, the multiple continuous distillations, and the extensive filtrations.

They make only 1000 cases a year, and are targeting serious spenders.

best regards, lm

p.s., In a small world coincidence, I was at an event at the Dallas Arboritum last week and there were artists tents of all kinds. One was a photographer that had many beautiful prints of colorful doorways in San Miguel De Allende. I bought a nice calender containing these photos. Now, a large part of the promotion of Casa Dragones is a connection to San Miguel De Allende, and the history of the Stables that housed the Cavalry that helped lead to the Mexican Independance. lm

Attached Files

  • Attached File  008.JPG   356.7KB   15 downloads
  • Attached File  010.JPG   534.44KB   13 downloads


#8 PaulG

PaulG

    Agave Aficionado

  • Agave friends
  • 318 posts

Posted 08 April 2011 - 11:06 PM

OK, this may be long and rambling.

There is only this product. No blanco, no repo, no anejo or XA.

First off, I had heard the word "joven", and knew it meant "young" or unaged, but had assumed it was an old term no longer used since all the tequilas I had ever seen were either blanco, platinum, crystal, silver or somesuch. After we were informed by Ms. Nieves that there were five official classifications of tequila; blanco, repo, anejo, XA, and joven, and that joven was a blend of blanco and XA, I googled it and sure enough, that is one of several definitions of joven. So I learned something.

Next, as my tequila friends know, I have no talent for discerning and describing the nuances (or lack thereof) of the noble juice. I'm a hack, and freely admit it. I do however, know when I like a product. I've tasted quite a few tequilas, good and bad. And I really liked this juice. For a blanco, and no technically it's not a blanco, it was spectacular. But it does look like a blanco, being perfectly crystal clear. It's one that when I inhale it, I smile and say "I could just smell this juice all night". It is most definately a fine sipping tequila.

You know how the product descriptions that the tequila makers provide usually sound ridiculous, with all kinds of fruit, spice, nuts, and floral flouishes? Well, I was reading the notes that are in a little book we got last night, and I have to wholeheartily agree with them. I don't think they overstated it:

"BODY & COLOR

Rich silk body, with brilliant platinum hues and long pronounced legs.

AROMA

Fresh and inviting, subtle floral and citrus aroma with notes of roasted agave.

TASTE

Soft and smooth with hints of vanilla and spiced undertones, balanced with delicate notes of pear.

Clean warm finish with hints of hazlenut and a bright, open aftertaste."

I didn't get the hazlenut, but everything else was right on.

Now to some production details. Some I got from Bertha, and some from her Texas sales director, Meridith Main. NOM 1489. They said they built their operations inside the plant. They use a diffuser. They use column distilation. They blend five year anejo with unaged product, then filter out all color. The XA is in new American Oak barrels. I asked if the XA was made with diffuser and she said yes.

They've spent some money on a very nice package of bottles, packaging, and promotional materials. The bottles are crystal, with a ground glass top. Very simple and understated, yet very elegant design. The box and promotional items are a beautiful blue color.

I would have loved to have a bottle, but at $270 plus tax = just under $300, I couldn't do it. It's simply out of my price range. For $100, yes no problem, I would have one for my collection. There were people buying it last night. But the type of people that shop at Siegels tend to have money. It's the most expensive liquor chain in Dallas. It was $250 next door at Goody Goody's.

I'd be curious to see what the blanco tasted like before they added the XA. Perhaps they had to blend XA with it to have any flavor given the diffuser, the multiple continuous distillations, and the extensive filtrations.

They make only 1000 cases a year, and are targeting serious spenders.

best regards, lm

p.s., In a small world coincidence, I was at an event at the Dallas Arboritum last week and there were artists tents of all kinds. One was a photographer that had many beautiful prints of colorful doorways in San Miguel De Allende. I bought a nice calender containing these photos. Now, a large part of the promotion of Casa Dragones is a connection to San Miguel De Allende, and the history of the Stables that housed the Cavalry that helped lead to the Mexican Independance. lm


Got a chance to try this on the way home this winter.For me I'd say many tequilas at 1/4 the price are just as good or better IMHO.
I'd call it a Marketing Tequila (not bad, just not as good as the marketing makes it out to be) It was a small sample,but I didn't ask for more eithe

#9 larry mac

larry mac

    Agave Paladin

  • Agave friends
  • 598 posts

Posted 09 April 2011 - 12:17 PM

Got a chance to try this on the way home this winter.For me I'd say many tequilas at 1/4 the price are just as good or better IMHO.
I'd call it a Marketing Tequila (not bad, just not as good as the marketing makes it out to be) It was a small sample,but I didn't ask for more eithe


That's about right. They are targeting people who want to buy something unique, and for whom cost isn't much of a consideration.

Two other things I'm curious about. What XA did they use? It obviously isn't their XA, they just got into the game relatively recently.

And how is color filtered out of a spirit? Isn't it a dissolved solid, as opposed to a suspended solid? Suspended solids are easily filterd out, I do it all the time in the lab, but only with water samples, not alcohol. But dissolved solids are not filtered out with a simple filter (that I know of). Of course if it was, I guess you wouldn't call it an "ultra modern filtration system". Wouldn't you risk filtering out some flavor also?

I may try filtering some anejo in the lab and see what happens.

best regards, lm

#10 PaulG

PaulG

    Agave Aficionado

  • Agave friends
  • 318 posts

Posted 09 April 2011 - 01:22 PM

I may try filtering some anejo in the lab and see what happens.

Let us know if you do. I'd like to know what happens????????

#11 *45*

*45*

    Transcendent Agave Master

  • Moderator
  • 1,834 posts

Posted 10 April 2011 - 03:47 PM

I'm glad to see her/they admit using the difusor and column distillation - while I never had any desire to want to taste Casa Dragones, now I know I have zero interest. as for the XA, that distillery has been around for a while so I'm sure they had a 3 year old barrel laying around somewhere. also something that everyone should know is that Destileria Leyros (NOM 1489) is part of the Cuervo machine, so it is easy to see the relationship between the old industry giant and Bertha Gonzalez Nieves. I also wanted to add that the cost of the juice inside that bottle can not exceed two american dollars.


  • SeattleJuan likes this

#12 larry mac

larry mac

    Agave Paladin

  • Agave friends
  • 598 posts

Posted 10 April 2011 - 04:06 PM

I'm glad to see her/they admit using the difusor and column distillation - while I never had any desire to want to taste Casa Dragones, now I know I have zero interest. as for the XA, that distillery has been around for a while so I'm sure they had a 3 year old barrel laying around somewhere. also something that everyone should know is that Destileria Leyros (NOM 1489) is part of the Cuervo machine, so it is easy to see the relationship between the old industry giant and Bertha Gonzalez Nieves.





I forgot to mention, she worked for Cuervo for some years. I think in a non-production capacity.

best regards, lm

#13 bpacifica

bpacifica

    Transcendent Agave Master

  • Agave friends
  • 1,374 posts

Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:23 PM

OK, this may be long and rambling.

There is only this product. No blanco, no repo, no anejo or XA.

First off, I had heard the word "joven", and knew it meant "young" or unaged, but had assumed it was an old term no longer used since all the tequilas I had ever seen were either blanco, platinum, crystal, silver or somesuch. After we were informed by Ms. Nieves that there were five official classifications of tequila; blanco, repo, anejo, XA, and joven, and that joven was a blend of blanco and XA, I googled it and sure enough, that is one of several definitions of joven. So I learned something.

Next, as my tequila friends know, I have no talent for discerning and describing the nuances (or lack thereof) of the noble juice. I'm a hack, and freely admit it. I do however, know when I like a product. I've tasted quite a few tequilas, good and bad. And I really liked this juice. For a blanco, and no technically it's not a blanco, it was spectacular. But it does look like a blanco, being perfectly crystal clear. It's one that when I inhale it, I smile and say "I could just smell this juice all night". It is most definately a fine sipping tequila.

You know how the product descriptions that the tequila makers provide usually sound ridiculous, with all kinds of fruit, spice, nuts, and floral flouishes? Well, I was reading the notes that are in a little book we got last night, and I have to wholeheartily agree with them. I don't think they overstated it:

"BODY & COLOR

Rich silk body, with brilliant platinum hues and long pronounced legs.

AROMA

Fresh and inviting, subtle floral and citrus aroma with notes of roasted agave.

TASTE

Soft and smooth with hints of vanilla and spiced undertones, balanced with delicate notes of pear.

Clean warm finish with hints of hazlenut and a bright, open aftertaste."

I didn't get the hazlenut, but everything else was right on.

Now to some production details. Some I got from Bertha, and some from her Texas sales director, Meridith Main. NOM 1489. They said they built their operations inside the plant. They use a diffuser. They use column distilation. They blend five year anejo with unaged product, then filter out all color. The XA is in new American Oak barrels. I asked if the XA was made with diffuser and she said yes.

They've spent some money on a very nice package of bottles, packaging, and promotional materials. The bottles are crystal, with a ground glass top. Very simple and understated, yet very elegant design. The box and promotional items are a beautiful blue color.

I would have loved to have a bottle, but at $270 plus tax = just under $300, I couldn't do it. It's simply out of my price range. For $100, yes no problem, I would have one for my collection. There were people buying it last night. But the type of people that shop at Siegels tend to have money. It's the most expensive liquor chain in Dallas. It was $250 next door at Goody Goody's.

I'd be curious to see what the blanco tasted like before they added the XA. Perhaps they had to blend XA with it to have any flavor given the diffuser, the multiple continuous distillations, and the extensive filtrations.

They make only 1000 cases a year, and are targeting serious spenders.

best regards, lm

p.s., In a small world coincidence, I was at an event at the Dallas Arboritum last week and there were artists tents of all kinds. One was a photographer that had many beautiful prints of colorful doorways in San Miguel De Allende. I bought a nice calender containing these photos. Now, a large part of the promotion of Casa Dragones is a connection to San Miguel De Allende, and the history of the Stables that housed the Cavalry that helped lead to the Mexican Independance. lm

Got the opportunity to try this last nite.  I didn't remember exactly what the story on this was and upon first pour and smell it caught my attention.  Really enjoyed it but when the price point and distillation/blending minutiae came to light, I just couldn't quite stay too excited about it.  All about the marketing, I guess.  Definitely worth a try (i.e. if someone offers you a taste, don't turn it down).