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Miel de agave


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#1 Cisco

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 10:20 PM

Can someone describe what miel de agave tastes like?
Is there a difference between miel de agave and miel de maguey?

I have four bottles, 2 generic w/o any kind of label and 2 with labels.

2 generic: smell like Vicks Vapor rub and taste very medicinal, like soap. Is miel de agave/maguey mixed with anything to make some type of medicinal concoction?

Dios Agave: Not as thick as honey, a little less sweet. Bottle say its organic, and a substitute for sugar. Tastes great.

Producto La Llama Verde: Bottle says its Miel de Maguey. Tastes sweet. Bottle states that its not medicinal but then goes on and says it good for some cough cases or respitory problems! hehehe. " Idea for all the family, students, athletes and as a geriatric supplement"! hehehe.

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#2 Mike Morales

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:48 AM

Maguey is the native/Spanish word for any type of agave.

The word agave in the title is used interchageably to refer to any agave.

Unless the producer actually says that the syrup is made specifically from blue webber agave (like Partida and 4 Copas), the source of the syrup could be from any havested maguey.

Not sure if some producers add something to their syrups to be used as medicine. Sounds almost like the start of fermenting pulque.

#3 dolfin

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 03:40 AM

B)

Can someone describe what miel de agave tastes like?



This is how two agave nectars sold at WFMkt taste to me:

The light organic blue agave nectar looks and tastes like a very light almost watered down -- not in the pejorative sense -- fine honey but with light subtle succulent floral overtones. Perfect for sweetening something without imparting unwanted overpowering flavors or aromas. Great for sweetening margaritas if that is your style. Cointreau makes as sweet a marggie as I need for the rare occasion -- like last week -- when I have one.

The organic raw blue agave nectar is darker in color, heavier with a very light toasty palate and more pronounced succulent floral overtones. Great for my "mojito" style limeade -- the mint is flourishing in the garden! I still prefer vermont grade "b" maple syrup for my oatmeal because it is strong enough to balance the organic butter, cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg I throw in.

Vicks?! I would tread lightly here. Find out more about this aroma before consuming.

Organic? Does the label identify the certifying entity?

Honey is also good for coughs especially when combined with citrus, so the label may not be exaggerating in that respect.

Is there a difference between miel de agave and miel de maguey?


No. The term "blue agave nectar/syrup" or whatever is really meaningless if the purpose of its inclusion in the label is to infer that it somehow it is made from the same agave which produces tequila. The term "blue agave" is colloquial and has no scientific meaning even though it is embraced by mezcal and tequila aficionados as well as folks in the tequila and agave nectar industry who should really know better when they use the term to refer to the agave from which tequila is made. There are many agaves whose color is blue. There is only one agave from which tequila is made and "blue" is not a part of its name.


See the following thread for more comments on agave nectar from some forum members:

http://www.ianchadwi...amp;#entry24920

Y Pancho?Posted Image

#4 dolfin

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 04:02 AM

This is the REAL link to other forum members' nectar opinions:

http://www.ianchadwi...amp;#entry23956

Sorry! Posted ImageCheck the links before you post!

#5 CaliTequilaSipperGirl

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Posted 20 June 2007 - 12:20 AM

The term "blue agave" is colloquial and has no scientific meaning even though it is embraced by mezcal and tequila aficionados as well as folks in the tequila and agave nectar industry who should really know better when they use the term to refer to the agave from which tequila is made. There are many agaves whose color is blue. There is only one agave from which tequila is made and "blue" is not a part of its name.



My understanding is that tequila is made from agave tequilana weber azul. Doesn't azul translate to blue?

#6 dolfin

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Posted 20 June 2007 - 07:04 AM

The term "blue agave" is colloquial and has no scientific meaning even though it is embraced by mezcal and tequila aficionados as well as folks in the tequila and agave nectar industry who should really know better when they use the term to refer to the agave from which tequila is made. There are many agaves whose color is blue. There is only one agave from which tequila is made and "blue" is not a part of its name.



My understanding is that tequila is made from agave tequilana weber azul. Doesn't azul translate to blue?


Hi Cali: Top o'the mornin' to ya -- or rather end ot the evening. Please see:

http://www.ianchadwi...?showtopic=3302

Comments are welcome over there. flipper

#7 lirubis

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Posted 20 June 2007 - 10:53 AM

Ana's knowledge and wisdom are unrivaled in this subject. If she says so, you can be sure of one thing: she did not made it up. And as far as I'm concerned, I also believe that the "azul" adjective came from common use of the name "agave azul tequilero" among producers and THEN got into everybody else's lingo. The term "blue tequilana weber" is perhaps the most used, when referring to the plant that is used as the sole source of tequila, but as far as diving into the scientific bottom of the name, I dont recall ever seeing the word "blue" in it.

BTW: the anecdote where Ana recalls the episode at Mundo Cuervo, where the guide failed to know the CORRECT name for the agave is hilarious!

#8 dolfin

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 09:09 PM

Ana's knowledge and wisdom are unrivaled in this subject. If she says so, you can be sure of one thing: she did not made it up. And as far as I'm concerned, I also believe that the "azul" adjective came from common use of the name "agave azul tequilero" among producers and THEN got into everybody else's lingo. The term "blue tequilana weber" is perhaps the most used, when referring to the plant that is used as the sole source of tequila, but as far as diving into the scientific bottom of the name, I dont recall ever seeing the word "blue" in it.

BTW: the anecdote where Ana recalls the episode at Mundo Cuervo, where the guide failed to know the CORRECT name for the agave is hilarious!


What do your pals at Av. Patria in Zapopan say? Preliminary investigation at the Library of Life Sciences at UT led to an introduction to a gentleman who has many lillies named after himself; in a thick accent he stated "vell, they can't do that -- but first you must look in these books." Then he showed me the books and how to use them! The librarian went to work for me on the subject as well, with delight!

¡Oye, popis: gran partido de fút este domingo! ¿Aquí entre nos, a quien le vas? Si me dices, no me rajo con tus cuates pa' que no te vean de prole. ¡Ja ja ja!Posted Image