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Bourbon Recommendations


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#1 RLO1

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 04:29 PM

I was surfing the net, and came accross a Bourbon forum where Evangelos happens to post.
Hopefully Evangelos or someone else can lead me in the right direction. I am too lazy to read through all the posts on that forum.
I have a bottle of Bookers 126 proof, and I really like the flavor. The sweetness and wood profile is just right for my taste, but it is a tad too strong. I drink it neat, but after a few sips, my insides feel like they are on fire. I'm thinking something in the 90-100 proof range, with the flavor profile of the Bookers would be perfect.
Other wood aged spirits I enjoy, in case they help for a bourbon recommendation;

Jack Daniel's
Single Barrel Jack
Matusalen Rum

I don't think these relate but here goes anyway;
Dun Fulano Añejo
JCRF
Paradiso
1942
Porfidio Single Barrel
ETA
Jimador Añejo

#2 Vange

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 05:16 PM

You are in luck! I recently co-authored an article on bourbon. Here is the link, but if you don't have the time I'll let you know about a few of my favs out there.

My favorite to date is Pappy Van Winkle 20 year. It's $80 though. If that is too much I would go with a sb.com forum favorite; Elmer T Lee for $25. One even better would be the Van Winkle Special Reserve Lot B as opposed to the ETL. That stuff is great and about $32. I like the Booker's, but I cut it with a bit of water.


http://orig.app.com/...f/topshelf.html

The above link is of the page on the web, to see the actual spread of the article

http://orig.app.com/..._spring2006.pdf

#3 RLO1

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Posted 12 March 2006 - 12:52 AM

Thanks Evangelos!
From the few threads I did read on the Bourbon forum, I did notice the Elmer T. Lee was mentioned as a good bourbon to have. I'll put that one on my list for my next trip to Hi-Times, they have it for $20.99, I wish good Tequila was in that price range!
Nice article by the way, The Bookers you have in the pic, is the exact bottle I have. I had read the one you had done on Tequila, which is also great! I happen to agree almost to the tenth, on all the Tequila's I have tried on that article.
:t_up:

I noticed the 51% Corn minimum. Are there 100% Bourbons out there? and are they any better?
If you have time, can you explain the differences in Whiskey's.
Tenessee Whiskey (Jack Daniel's)
Irish Whiskey (Bushmills)
Scotch Whiskey (Johnny Walker Premier, Black, Chivas Regal 12yr)
Bourbon (Bookers)

Taste wise, I can tell the difference between them, and the denomination, but that's about it.
I prefer Bourbon over all the rest, then the Jack.
The Irish is ok, but it tastes a little like Cognac to me.
Scoth, I dislike, way too much leather, yuk!

#4 Vange

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 03:07 PM

The scotch you listed as having tasted are all blends. I do like blends, but I tend to like the JW Blues of the world and that higher level of blended scotch. My favorite scotches are single malt scotch whiskies. Try a few of them and you won't be disappointed. Any Macallan would be a good place to start. Try Mac 12 or Mac 18 and you'llbe hooked. (I was)

Tennessee Whiskey is different than bourbon in that it goes through a charcoal filtration process. Ten. Whiskey is NOT bourbon because of this process but does contain 51% corn just like bourbon. As for a 100% corn whiskey there are some, but they are not in high demand mot very good from what I hear/read. Most bourbons 2nd most used ingredient is rye or wheat. I tend to favor the wheaters.

There are so many different types of scotch whiskey. Let's just talk to two of them. The two most popular. Single malts scotch whiskey and blended scotch whiskey.

From Wikipedia:
"Single malt Scotch is a type of Scotch whisky, distilled by a single distillery, using malted barley as the only grain ingredient. This is in contrast to blended whisky, which consists of a mixture of single malt whiskies and ethanol derived from grains. (A blend using only single malt whiskies is known as vatted malt.) All single malt Scotch must be produced using a pot still, and be distilled, aged and bottled"

I recently bought a bottle of good Irish Whiskey. When I crack it I'll report my findings. It's a Midleton Very Rare from 2004. The only other Irish whiskies I have tried were Jameson and Tulamore Dew. They are ok.

-------------------------------------------------

JUST SOME MORE DEFINITIONS FROM EGULLET.COM (i am a member there also)

Single Malt Scotch Whiskey - is a type of Scotch whisky, distilled by a single distillery, using malted barley as the only grain ingredient"

Single Cask Malt - single malt whiskey with the added stipulation that it all came from the same cask.

Vatted Malt - malt whiskies come from more than one distillery to make up the end product.

Blended Whiskey - blend of (mostly) grain whiskey with some malt whiskey most often from a number of distilleries.

Bottled in Bond: American spirits produced according to the Bottled Bond Act of 1894. This is a way to avoid paying excise tax until the spirits are aged and ready for sale; also originally indended to ensure that the spirit was actually what it claimed to be. Bonded spirits are aged no less than four years in a government bonded warehouse and must be bottled at proof (50% abv).

Bourbon: Straight Whiskey where the primary grain is corn. Purists would argue that it is only made in Kentucky, although this is not a legal requirement. It is the official distilled spirit of the United States.

Canadian Whisky: By law, this is a blended whisky of cereal grains aged no less than three years.

Mash: A term used mostly by traditional American distillers. Refers to the fermenting mixture of water, grains, yeast and sometimes hops from which whiskey is made.

Rye Whiskey (American): Straight Whiskey made with rye as the primary grain.

Rye Whisky (Canadian): Another name for Canadian Whisky, most of which contain little if any rye.

Sour Mash: A technique used in the production of many straight whiskeys wherein a portion of the mash is held back and allowed to "sour" then added to the mash on a following day.

Straight Whiskey: By law, the grain bill must contain no less than 51% and no more than 79% of the primary grain. It must be distilled to no more than 160 proof (80% abv), aged for at least two years at no more than 125 proof (62.5% abv) in charred new oak barrels, and bottled at no less than 80 proof (40% abv). No neutral grain spirits or any other substances may be added.

Tennessee Whiskey: Straight Whiskey where the primary grain is corn, but where the raw distillate is treated with the Lincoln County Process (filtration through ten feet of maple charcoal) before being dumped into barrels for aging.

#5 RLO1

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:49 AM

Thanks for the info, it clears up most of my confusion with all the diffrent Whiskey's.
I picked up a bottle of the Elmer T. Lee today, I'll be cracking it open tomorrow!
I didn't see any of the Van Winkle line at this particular BevMo.

#6 Vange

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 11:12 AM

The Van Winkle line is great stuff. Enjoy the ETL tonight. If you liked the Booker's you should lov ethe ETL. It's aged between 10-14 years in case you were wondering.

#7 RockDog

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 01:31 PM

I have a bottle of Bookers 126 proof, and I really like the flavor. The sweetness and wood profile is just right for my taste, but it is a tad too strong. I drink it neat, but after a few sips, my insides feel like they are on fire. I'm thinking something in the 90-100 proof range, with the flavor profile of the Bookers would be perfect.

Hi RLO1

Evangelos has given you some excellent advice, I really love the ETL as well, and It's a bargain. Anything from Buffalo Trace is good, and many of their products are simply outstanding. It's my favorite bourbon distillery.

In terms of the Bookers, as Evangelos said, simply dilute it to the strength you prefer. Make sure you use high quality water (bottled). Booker Noe would have used "branch" water (the same water used at the distillery) to make his Kentucky Tea (very diluted bourbon for sipping). I was fortunate enough to meet him and talk with him about bourbon before his untimely passing.

One of the benefits of higher proof or cask strength bourbon (or other spirits) is that you get more for your money, due to the usual practice of adding water before drinking (I know that these higher proof spirits do tend to cost more up front).

Anyway, find a method that suits you and keep exploring other expressions/bottlings. The obvious reason that bourbon is so economical is that is is a domestic product. No importing or tariff hassles. Conversely, bourbon can be very expensive in Japan, where it is becoming more appreciated and popular.

#8 RockDog

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 02:16 PM

Hi Evangelos,

Took a look at your collection, nice! Where did you get the Evan Williams 23 Yr? I've never seen (or heard) of that one. Nice job on getting the Hirsch 20YR. I don't have any of those. I have over 60 bourbons (and Tenn. Whiskies) with some repeats (different years). I have every Stagg except for the 2005 KY only spring release (I have the 70.6 % version). Most of the Eagle Rare 17 yr and Sazeracs 18 YR as well. Do you like Ryes? I have grown to appreciate them. One of my new favorites is Van Winkle 13 YR.

On another topic, how do you drink your bourbon? Since I started my spirits appreciation journey with Single Malts, I used to drink all bourbons neat. I revised my practice and opinion after a trip to Bardstown, KY where I got to meet and talk with many master distillers (Booker, Parker Beam, Elmer, Jimmy Russell, and several others). I noticed that most of them (and the other Kentuckians) were drinking their bourbon on the rocks, or at least with water added. We discussed this practice and it was pointed out to me that unlike Single Malt, boubon is always aged in a new barrel, is generally bottled at a younger age, and is usually a much bolder and more assertive spirit than most malts. I realize that this is a generalization, and of course, exceptions exist. Because of these facts, boubon stands up to both dilution and colder temperatures better than most malts, and in my revised opinion, often benefits from them. So now my usual practice is to use ice. I still drink rare and special bottlings without ice, diluted if necessary, in order to fully appreciate all of the subtle flavors and aromas. Any other opinions out there?

#9 Vange

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 02:38 PM

"Where did you get the Evan Williams 23 Yr? "

I got it offline ebay from some guy (I don't remember the details). I haven't tried it yet, but Michael Jackson gave it a good review as well as some others on sb.com. It is an export only bourbon and there are a bunch of export only bourbons that typically are extra aged. It seems the Japanese have a higher demand for extra aged bourbon 20+ years. I find it odd, but I understand the rationale. Some others are Old Man Winter 25, Martin Milsl 24, etc.

"Nice job on getting the Hirsch 20YR. I don't have any of those."

When I found them I literally got butterflies in my stomach and my heart skipped a beat. I had just found a piece of US history! They were at the top of a shelf covered in dust. I cradled them like babies and brought them to the cashier. When she rang them up she did a triple take! $460! She thought there was a mistake, but I assured her, no mistake, just a fine spirit.

"I have over 60 bourbons (and Tenn. Whiskies) with some repeats (different years). I have every Stagg except for the 2005 KY only spring release (I have the 70.6 % version). Most of the Eagle Rare 17 yr and Sazeracs 18 YR as well. Do you like Ryes? I have grown to appreciate them. One of my new favorites is Van Winkle 13 YR."

60+ bourbons! NICE! That is one hell of a collection. If you ever want to unload a Stagg from 2002 or 2003, let me know. They are on my hunting list. Stagg is a trully great bourbon and I hear the first 2 releases are arguably the best. I am starting to dabble in the ryes. Give me a few more months for opinions on those. Though currently I am setting up an article for rum, so I have been in a heavy rum mode.

"On another topic, how do you drink your bourbon? Since I started my spirits appreciation journey with Single Malts, I used to drink all bourbons neat. I revised my practice and opinion after a trip to Bardstown, KY where I got to meet and talk with many master distillers (Booker, Parker Beam, Elmer, Jimmy Russell, and several others). I noticed that most of them (and the other Kentuckians) were drinking their bourbon on the rocks, or at least with water added. We discussed this practice and it was pointed out to me that unlike Single Malt, boubon is always aged in a new barrel, is generally bottled at a younger age, and is usually a much bolder and more assertive spirit than most malts. I realize that this is a generalization, and of course, exceptions exist. Because of these facts, boubon stands up to both dilution and colder temperatures better than most malts, and in my revised opinion, often benefits from them. So now my usual practice is to use ice. I still drink rare and special bottlings without ice, diluted if necessary, in order to fully appreciate all of the subtle flavors and aromas. Any other opinions out there?"

I drink all my bourbons neat that are not overproofed. I dilute the overproof bourbons with bottled spring water. I do have one ritual though. I drink my first glass/snifter of each new bourbon neat with no dilution no matter the proof. I do this to get a really good feel for the bourbon. Once I have that, I dilute if necessary. Also, there are certain bourbons I cannot drink neat. i.e. Maker's Mark. I have to drink that one over ice.

#10 RLO1

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 01:36 AM

I briefly tatsed the ETL tonight. I had a squirt w/tequila with dinner, than I poured me a snifter of the ETL. In retrospect, I probably shouln't have, I still had some of the squirt/tequila on the palate, and probably didn't do the ETL justice. Regardless of that, it was still very good, just as good as the Bookers, if not better! Truly a bargain @ $21, compared to the $50 price tag for the Bookers.
I had thought of cutting the proof of the Bookers with water, but I really like the flavor, and I thought that adding water would screw up the taste. I'll give it a try, and see how the flavor changes.
Have you guys tried the Rock Hill Farms?

I still prefer Tequila as my #1 spirit, but Bourbon has moved into my #2 slot without a doubt!

#11 RockDog

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 11:29 AM

I had thought of cutting the proof of the Bookers with water, but I really like the flavor, and I thought that adding water would screw up the taste. I'll give it a try, and see how the flavor changes.
Have you guys tried the Rock Hill Farms?

I still prefer Tequila as my #1 spirit, but Bourbon has moved into my #2 slot without a doubt!

Adding water may decrease the intensity of the flavors somewhat, but shouldn't change the overall flavor. After all, cask strength bourbon contains so much alcohol that it starts to affect (deaden) taste buds. As another option, try drinking it on the rocks. Although some may disagree with this method, as I mentioned above, I have grown to like it. It's at least worth a try. I even drink lower proof bourbons like the ETL on ice, it's just my preference.

Haven't tried the Rock Hill. Is it any good?

In terms of my favorite spirit (is there any such thing, I like most of them?), I tend to drink more bourbon in the colder months and more tequila in the warmer. It's pretty tough sipping an intensely flavored, high proof bourbon on a sweltering summer day.

#12 Vange

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 11:48 AM

I have not personally tried RHF, but if they offer it at Whiskey Live 2006 in NYC, I'll give it a shot and express my opinion here. Most people on sb.com like it a lot, but for the price prefer ETL.

Are we the only 3 bourbon/tequila lovers out there? I am quickly becoming a fan of so many spirits (SMSW, blended whiskey, cognac, rum, tequila, bourbon, irish whiskey, etc.) and appreciating each and every one for what they are and what they offer. I have my favorites of course (tequila), but my mood dictates what bottle I grab from my bar to enjoy that evening.

#13 RLO1

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Posted 28 March 2006 - 11:58 PM

I found some Van Winkle Special Reserve Lot B today, picked up a bottle for $32.99! They had the 20 yr old as well for $67.99, maybe next time.
The store I stock up on El Tesoro Añejo, turns out, has what seems to be a nice selection of Bourbons.
They also had the Elmer T Lee for an unbelievable price of $16.99. I love Jack and Coke, but at that price I think it's going to be Elmer and Coke!

#14 Vange

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 12:05 AM

GREAT prices!

#15 RockDog

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Posted 29 March 2006 - 10:05 AM

They also had the Elmer T Lee for an unbelievable price of $16.99. I love Jack and Coke, but at that price I think it's going to be Elmer and Coke!

That is an unbelievable price, but I'm cringing at the thought of mixing it with coke. To each his own, I know, but it reminds me of a guy I knew in the Army who mixed Remy Martin VSOP with coke. You could always use something cheaper (but still good) like Evan Williams Black Label (which is no longer labeled as 7 yr old, by the way----bummer).

#16 RLO1

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 01:07 AM


They also had the Elmer T Lee for an unbelievable price of $16.99. I love Jack and Coke, but at that price I think it's going to be Elmer and Coke!

That is an unbelievable price, but I'm cringing at the thought of mixing it with coke. To each his own, I know, but it reminds me of a guy I knew in the Army who mixed Remy Martin VSOP with coke. You could always use something cheaper (but still good) like Evan Williams Black Label (which is no longer labeled as 7 yr old, by the way----bummer).


I hear you!
In my defense though, I go through a 1.75 bottle of regular Jack in about 45-60 days. I very rarely drink it straight, mostly with coke, or every now and then, homemade Lynchburg Lemonades.
I really like the ETL neat, but @ $16.99, I can afford to substitute the Jack and Cokes, with a much higher quality whiskey. Regular Jack $15 - 750ml, $29 - 1.75ml.

I have a friend that drinks his Hennessy XO with Coke :o

#17 Vange

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Posted 30 March 2006 - 11:48 AM

Mixing coke with any nice bourbon, cognac, or rum just makes me batty.
With that said, I can never drink jack or captain morgan neat. Those are mixers ONLY. Now, as far as cognacs go, I guess a VS with coke? Maybe. If at VSOP or abaove, NEVER mix it. Why ruin the spirit!

Oh well, years ago I thought JC Gold was good. Then again, I did order it chilled to take the sting out of it's bite.

#18 Vodoun

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 09:50 PM

Here are my thoughts on American whiskey listed in more or less descending order for me. I drink all spirits strait up and warm so if you use ice or water the results could greatly vary. For what its worth I tend to like very THICK strongly flavored beverages. The meal in a glass concept. I like mezcal, cask strength scotches, and dark south American rums. I dont mind heat but I hate a thin stingy finish that I equate with tasting the blow back of insecticide. If you know rum, Rhum agricole has that finish and I hate it all. If your drink is going to have that meal like quality it needs a rich thick coating finish.



Sazerac Rye - Not really bourbon but usually clumped with them. Subtle. Dry. Complex. It takes some time to appreciate it I think. I love this whiskey.

Van Winkle Rye 13 - Richer than the Sazerac and a bit thicker but with more bite. I like both a lot.

George T Stagg - Great potential. I tasted this in a bar during a marathon evening with long lost friends. So I cant do a fair comparison. I REALLY liked it a lot. Delicious but tops the Bookers in proof at 146. Most telling, my wife who is not fond of a strong alcohol presence, really liked it too. So it must have something good going on. More evaluation is required. I am searching for a bottle.

Bookers - Rich. Dark. I have heard it compared to BBQ. Somehow I see that. Perhaps my favorite bourbon. But you have to press through the first couple of sips till you can adjust to the heat. And do not mix with food. You have to re-adjusst your tastebuds again after every bite.

Rowans Creek - This may be what you are looking for. Similar flavor profile to Bookers. Still a bit strong but the burn is somehow low constant and in the background. Head to head with the bookers. Perhaps my new favorite.

Evan Williams Single Barrel 1994 - Still thick but slightly grassy. This is the El Tesoro Anejo of Bourbons. 95 is said to be even better.

Elmer T Lee - The fruitiest bourbon. Very good. Relatively smooth.

Wild Turkey Rare Breed - A bit of a citrus peel flavor. If you like regular Wild Turkey you should like it better. 108 proof but pretty smooth and its thicker. Its a change of pace drink for me.

Elijah Craig 18 - The woodiest bourbon Ive tried. A little disjointed somehow. There are days that I dont think I like it. I plan to have one more taste and relegate it to mixer status. But I always taste it and leave it on display with the sipping liquors. Must be pretty good.

Van Winkle 15 - I had this once in a bar but I think its may favorite Van Winkle. Good flavor overcomes a higher proof. Actually smoother to me than the other VWs. Maybe since it is less diluted it has more of the texture that I like. More research required.

Van Winkle 12 Lot B - Good but it has just a little bit of that zingy finish that takes away something for me.

Van Winkle 20 - A little too musty/mushroomy for my taste and no smoother than the 12B to me. Its good whiskey but I like the more vibrant $35 bottles marginally better. To each his own I guess. I tend to like young to middle aged scotches too.

Blantons - Good all round - but not great at anything either.

Rock Hill - Great rich sweet start. Disappointing zingy finish. I had such high hopes for this one.

Bakers - Im not sure where to put this one. Its been too long since I tried it. I know it was my second favorite of the small batch collection. Unusual flavor. I think I read something about a special yeast. In any case it isnt near the top of the list.

Knob Creek - Also tolerable and fairly generic

Makers Mark - Not bad. Not great either.

Wellers Centennial - Good flavor. Strong insecticide finish.

Basil Hadens - Fairly thin. Strong green wood/grassy taste. Too light for me.

Woodford Reserve - Quite thin. Which I find intolerable in spirits.

Jack Daniels Single Barrel = Bleah! Undrinkable.



On my wish list but not yet tried - Eagle Rare 17 , Elijah Craig 12 , Wild Turkey Russels Reserve, Noahs Mill.

#19 Vange

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 07:12 AM

Vodoun welcome!

Take a look at this boubon article I co-authored recently. See what you think about our selections and ratings. I think you'll find some that are on par with your certain tastes.

Website spread
http://orig.app.com/...f/topshelf.html

Actual magazine spread (pdf)
http://orig.app.com/..._spring2006.pdf

#20 Vodoun

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 11:41 AM

Very nice.

You are tempting me on the Eagle Rare. Ive been eyeng a bottle just down the street.

I forgot the AH Hirsh. One of my favorites. Probably just above the Evan Williams in my list. I rationalized not buying it because its going to run out some day. Why get started.....

I havent tried the 15 year old Turkey limited edition.

#21 Vange

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 02:15 PM

I even own the impossible to find AH Hirsch 20! I have the Evan Williams 23 that I have yet to open.
Pappy 23 is another rare great bourbon.

WT Tribute is a great bourbon with a more of a rye taste rather than wheat.

#22 Vodoun

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 03:41 PM

WT Tribute is a great bourbon with a more of a rye taste rather than wheat.


I would probably like that. I havent seen it lately though.

#23 Vange

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 07:30 PM

I am pretty sure it isnt made anymore. Ebay has it quite often. I had to pay over $100 for it.

#24 Vodoun

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Posted 21 May 2006 - 10:30 PM

I just picked up a bottle of the George T Stagg 141.2 proof, I presume the latest release but dont know (apparently the vintage is important).

It is OUT OF THIS WORLD. Its 3/4 alchohol and warm but surprisingly smooth. Uncut and unfiltered. Intense flavor. Amazing stuff.

#25 Vange

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 10:01 AM

Yes, that is the current release of GTS of the BT antique collection. It's great stuff! One of the favs on sb.com.

#26 Attilio_Bettega

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 11:02 AM

I used to really like bourbon but with the passage of the years I like it less than I used to.
With all the exotic tasting Tequilas and Grappas I have tried, bourbon is not as interesting.

That said, if you love the woody taste, a nice bourbon can go a long way. I suppose if you're into cigars, bourbon can also mate better than the more delicate tequilas.

Again, I have not ventured much past the 40 dollar mark in that area, although that means something because it's been a while and you have to adjust that for inflation.


The ones I have liked are, in order from strongest to least strong flavor:

1) Wild Turkey rare breed (VERY strong, beware)

2) Knob Creek (more complex, I bought one as a gift for a close friend in Italy who described it as "maschio" or "very masculine/macho")

3) Maker's Mark: I know some don't like this but it sacrifices some flavor in the interest of a more "feminine" and smooth nature.

#27 Ubertaster

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 08:03 PM

I have settled on Elijah Craig 12yo and Buffalo Trace for my front of the bar bourbons but I seem to have an affinity to cask strength bourbons as of late. At the end of the night I like to put myself to bed with the likes of William LaRue Weller or George T. Stagg. I like to drink them neat with a glass of ice water on the side to sip once in a while. I am still first and foremost a Tequila drinker but like to drink my bourbon once in a while. I have a couple dozen different kinds open on my bar to sample when I get the urge.

bj

#28 don Pablo

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 04:24 PM

I don't know anything about bourbons, though at a party recently I saw Wild Turkey and Wild Turkey 12 year old next to each other. (I guess I am assuming that those are bourbons.) I smelled them both, and the former smelled vile, the latter good. I tasted the 12 year and was relatively impressed/surprised.

Since then I have determined that in my bar I want to have one bottle of pedestrian bourbon, and one bottle of good stuff. I probably already have the average crap, so now I need the good stuff. I'd like it to be something that a connoisseur would appreciate. And I'd like it to be something that not everyone recognizes. And I'd like to be able to order it from the CA online stores for $40 or less (give or take). And given that I liked the WT12, I suppose I'd like something along those lines (or better).

Any suggestions?

BTW, I'll also be doing this for rum (though I may already have good stuff), whiskey, and a couple others. I have vodka and Scotch taken care of already. This whole exercise is an effort to reduce the size of my bar -- I have too much crap already (Jim, Jack, Maker's Mark, etc.) -- and I just want one name-brand (but probably mixer quality) bottle and one top-shelf (or close to it) bottle of each major liquor -- with the notable exception of tequila, for which I'd still like 100+ bottles of the good stuff.....

#29 Morpheus

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 03:31 AM

Don Pablo,

Go for the Van Winkle line. Any of their bourbons from 12 years to 20 years are excellent.
Eagle Rare 17 is also good. My "house" bourbon is Woodford's Reserve, but I am anxiously awaiting their "Four Grain Special Select"

#30 Vange

Vange

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 10:39 AM

A few things:

1)
From what I understand the Woodford 4 grain is terrible! I have not tried it, but I have yet to read a good review.

2) DP, I agree with Morpheus, the Van Winkle line is probably my favorite. The Pappy 20 is my favorite bourbon to date, but is around $80. The 15 year is in the 40s. WT12 are no longer made, so if you find some let me know (I may want some!) and keep a few for yourself. There are 2 variations of the WT12, a split label and a goil label I think. Regardless, it's a great bourbon! If you really want to stick to Wild Turkey, there is a WT product called Tribute. It's another not made anymore and in $80 range, but EXCELLENT!!

3) If you want an everyday inexpensive bourbon to have onhand, get Elmer T Lee. it's wonderful for the price. $20.

Good luck!